18 September 2011

Fruit bowl decoupage

I've had a rather ugly fruit bowl forever. I'm not sure where it came from, but several times it's been on the brink of being rehoused at the charity shop, only to be saved by its practicality at the last minute.

As it has survived for so long, I thought maybe that little fruit bowl deserved a revamp so it could live out its days on my kitchen table without embarrassment.



























Decoupage is a really easy way of updating tired bits of furniture. It's a bit more complicated that just a lick of paint, but the results can be really lovely and unique, and it doesn't take much more than a bit of pretty paper and some glue.















The first time you have a go at decoupage, I'd recommend you try something with flat surface, and straight edges to keep life simple - the Fruit Bowl Project turned out to be a bit fiddly. Cutting slits (splices) into the scraps of paper allowed it to lie flat over the curved surfaces though. Alternatively, if you use thinner paper, you should be fine.



Decoupage
Pretty paper (I used wrapping paper, but you could use old maps, or anything really, as long as it's not too thick or too flimsy)
PVA glue
Varnish
Scissors
Paintbrush
Furniture to decorate
Sandpaper

First of all, if your furniture has a high shine, sand it down well, and brush away any dust.

Cut your paper into small shapes (because of the pattern on the paper I used, I cut a rectangle about 3cm x 8cm around each bird).

Brush glue onto the surface of the furniture, working on just one part at a time, and smooth the squares of paper on top. You can overlap with other pieces of paper, but ensure that all edges have glue on them and there are no air bubbles.

When you get to the edges, splice the paper to avoid it bunching around any curved edges. If the furniture has straight edges, the paper can just be wrapped over without cutting.

When you've covered your furniture, leave it to dry completely, then brush two or more thin layers of varnish over all of the decoupage areas - leaving it to dry for the recommended time between coats.

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